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BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies

Overview

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies (BSc AIS) is now accepting students for 2013-14.

As of 2013-4, BSc AIS will be offered from Year 1, with an expanded number of dedicated module offerings. In addition, the programme will continue to be available as a transfer option for 2nd and 3rd year BSc Architecture students within the Bartlett. (If you are an existing BSc Architecture student, please look under ‘Entry Requirements’ for information about transferring.)

This programme replaces an existing BSc (Hons) programme, BSc Architectural Studies, which has been running since 2002-3 and has an excellent track record, with over 90 graduates. The success of the course is such that the Bartlett has decided to extend the programme.

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The educational aim of BSc AIS is to educate students to work within an expanded definition and understanding of architecture. It addresses architectural space from an interdisciplinary perspective, explores alternative approaches to architectural design and creative practice, and situates work in a broad urban, social, historical and cultural context.

There are two streams to BSc AIS:

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies (3 year) &

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies with Year Abroad (4 year)

BSc AIS introduces students to key architectural ideas and spatial strategies through core courses. Some of these are shared with BSc Architecture (ARB/RIBA Part 1) and some are specific to BSc AIS. The programme aims to incorporate activity-based learning through research and creative practice components, which explore media, objects, and representational modes of architecture (text, models, drawings, film, software, or any combination of these) and develops skills in the use of these media. There is also an emphasis on on-site learning supported by study visits and an annual field trip.

The programme provides students with the necessary intellectual and practical skills to engage with architecture and the city in an increasingly globalized age, allowing them to consider how identity, cultural values, economics and environmental concerns shape and are shaped by the built environment. These ongoing processes will be explored not only through the disciplinary tools of architecture (though these remain a focus), but also those from other disciplines from art history to anthropology to management, where appropriate.

This flexible approach encourages the development of independent-minded and culturally sensitive graduates who are well equipped to problem solve in complex environments of all kinds.

Key Features of BSc AIS:

· Emphasis on Design and Creative Practice

The BSc AIS’s own design and creative practice course (Project X) are offered from Years 1 to 3. These are unique to the programme and strongly encourage a speculative approach to design. These courses allow students to develop a wide range of practical skills, learning to research and survey objects, buildings, and sites through various means.

· Interdisciplinarity/Flexibility

The BSc AIS offers a specialism in architecture without the constraints of ARB/RIBA Part 1 requirements. A very wide range of options can be selected from other UCL departments and a high degree of customization is possible within one’s chosen path. Popular departments for the selection of modules include: Anthropology, Art History, Archaelogy, Centre for International Health and Development, Economics, European Languages Society and Culture, Geography, History, Languages (Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish), Management, Psychology.

· Field Trips/Study Abroad Option

Every year, BSc AIS students are also able to go on a dedicated field trip (2009, Venice; 2010, Paris; 2011, Amsterdam). BSc AIS with Year Abroad students additionally will benefit from a full year abroad (Year 3) supported by UCL’s International Office.

· Educational Environment

The BSc AIS offers students an opportunity to be based at the Bartlett, the UK’s top-rated Architectural School, in a stimulating and creative environment. Students participate in the Bartlett’s Annual Student Show and may take advantage of the full range of evening lectures and exhibitions at the Bartlett, UCL, and London.

Structure

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies (3 year)

The BSc AIS is a 3-year degree programme. In any given year, 60% of student’s modules must come from within the Bartlett; up to 40% of modules can be made up of electives from any other UCL department.

There are no compulsory modules in Years 1 or 2, but all BSc AIS students will be expected to take optional modules (2.5 modules a year) from within the Faculty of the Built Environment (Architecture, Planning and Construction Management) and elective modules elsewhere in UCL.

In Year 3, students must take either ENVS 3020 or 3032 or both.

Courses include the following:

Year 1

ENVS 1026 Media Studies: Looking, making, and communicating .5cu
ENVS 1027 Project X: Design and Creative Practice .5cu
ENVS 1028 Architectural Research I .5cu
ENVS 1001 The Historical and Cultural Production of Cities and their Architecture .5cu
  Optional modules in the Bartlett Min. .5cu
 

Elective modules in other UCL departments

[e.g. Anthropology, Art History, Archaeology, Centre for International Health and Development, Economics, European Languages Society and Culture, Geography, History, Languages (Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish), Management, Psychology.]

Max. 1.5cu
TOTAL   4 cu

Year 2

ENVS 2037 Project X: Design and Creative Practice 1cu
ENVS 2041 Architectural Research II .5cu
ENVS 2034 Architectural History & Theory .5cu
  Optional modules in the Bartlett Min. .5cu
  Elective modules in other UCL departments Max. 1.5cu
TOTAL   4 cu

Year 3

Note: It is compulsory to take either ENVS 3020 or 3032. (Students may still opt to take both.)

ENVS 3032 Project X: Design and Creative Practice 1cu
ENVS 3020 Dissertation 1cu
  Optional modules in the Bartlett

Min. 1 to 1.5cu

  Elective modules in other UCL departments Max. 1.5cu
TOTAL   4 cu


BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies with Year Abroad (4 year)

The BSc (Hons) Architectural and Interdisciplinary Studies is a 4-year degree programme. In any given year, 60% of student’s modules must come from within the Bartlett; up to 40% of modules can be made up of electives from any other UCL department.

There are no compulsory modules in Years 1 or 2, but all BSc AIS students will be expected to take optional modules (2.5 modules a year) from within the Faculty of the Built Environment (Architecture, Planning and Construction Management) and elective modules elsewhere in UCL.

In Year 3, students will spend their third year abroad studying at another university with the support of the UCL Study Abroad team. There are three different types of programme/opportunity available:

a) Erasmus programme

b) Departmental exchanges and UCL Exchanges

c) Independent study at an approved institution

For further information, please consult the UCL Study Abroad website

In Year 4, students must take either ENVS 3020 or 3032 or both.

Courses include the following:

ENVS 1026 Media Studies: Looking, making, and communicating .5cu
ENVS 1027 Project X: Design and Creative Practice .5cu
ENVS 1028 Architectural Research I .5cu
ENVS 1001 The Historical and Cultural Production of Cities and their Architecture .5cu
  Optional modules in the Bartlett

Min. .5cu

 

Elective modules in other UCL departments

[e.g. Anthropology, Art History, Archaeology, Centre for International Health and Development, Economics, European Languages Society and Culture, Geography, History, Languages (Arabic, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Mandarin and Spanish), Management, Psychology.]

Max. 1.5cu
TOTAL   4 cu

 Year 2

ENVS 2037 Project X: Design and Creative Practice 1cu
ENVS 2041 Architectural Research II .5cu
ENVS 2034 Architectural History & Theory .5cu
Optional modules in the Bartlett Min. .5cu
Elective modules in other UCL departments Max. 1.5cu
TOTAL   4 cu

Year 3

YEAR ABROAD

Year 4

Note: It is compulsory to take either ENVS 3020 or 3032. (Students may still opt to take both.)

ENVS 3032 Project X: Design and Creative Practice 1cu
ENVS 3020 Dissertation 1cu
Optional modules in the Bartlett Min. 1 to 1.5cu
Elective modules in other UCL departments Max. 1.5 cu
TOTAL   4 cu

Content

The BSc AIS aims to produce graduates who have an ability to think relationally, and to understand the importance of context (of different disciplines, cultures, and environments). This is central to the BSc AIS’s philosophy and is the key to addressing the challenges of the 21st century – sustainability, intercultural interaction, well being, and global health.

At the core of BSc AIS programme is its specially tailored courses in Design and Creative Practice (Project X) and Architectural Research. These are offered from Year 1 in order to provide general and subject-specific skills development for future study and employment, including:

· Computing skills that are central to design studies and portfolio creation

· Key tools and techniques of architecture design and fabrication (casting, modeling, sketching, drawing, photography, film)

· Key research and dissemination skills (interviewing, researching, curating, writing)

· Presentation skills that allow ideas and information to be clearly communicated in visual, oral, and written forms

Distinct features of the course’s teaching and learning approach are:

· the emphasis upon on-site or activity-based learning supported by study visits and field trips

· the emphasis on the constant production of small assignments for seminars/tutorials which build up to a larger portfolio of work

· the emphasis on group critiques (‘crits’) where students learn to explain their work, listen to and evaluate feedback, and make decisions about how to incorporate it into the next phase of their project

Project X: Design and Creative Practice

Architectural education for professionally validated courses is required to meet the academic criteria of the professional bodies of the RIBA and ARB. BSc AIS does not have this prescription, which allows it a much broader and speculative approach to the study of architecture. Accordingly the BSc AIS module Project X: Design and creative practice is able to encourage and support an inclusive yet also proactive attitude to related disciplines. In recent years these have included: sculpture, sound production, filmmaking, sustainable design, choreography, set design, cartography and knitting! etc.

Year 1 Project X: Design and Creative Practice I

‘Project X: Design and Creative Practice I’ is a 10-week course offered in Term 2.  There is a logical progression to this course from the Term1 module ‘Media Studies: Looking, making, and communicating’ giving students the chance to utilise the skills and techniques they have developed on that module. The course will encourage students to begin to develop an understanding of and an approach to design and creative practice. There will be two set project briefs, one, a shorter group project and the other to be undertaken individually. Each will allow the students to develop their own personal creative stance. The module will be taught through weekly group or individual tutorials and will include visits to exhibitions and relevant architectural sites.

Year 2 Project X: Design and Creative Practice II

‘Project X: Design and Creative Practice’ is taught across all three terms. Three related but distinct project briefs are set in term 1 and are tutored via a combination of seminars, workshops, group and individual tutorials with a critique (pin-up review) with invited critics taking place each term. At the end of term 1 each student will make a proposal for a project that they will develop in terms 2 and 3 to the end of the academic year. The main project starts with initial research of precedents and techniques, students are encouraged to write a ‘brief’ (design programme) which in turn would be developed into a speculative design proposal that can be made, drawn, filmed etc. Weekly tutorials continue on an individual and group basis through to May when work is examined through a portfolio submission.

Year 3 Project X: Design and Creative Practice III

‘Project X: Design and Creative Practice’ may be taken for the first time in Year 3, but often students will have taken the module in Year 2 and ideally they will have taken the Year 1 version of the module too. The course structure and assessment criteria for Year 3 are the same as for Year 2, but Year 3 students are encouraged to produce a more ambitious and focused project, which often can help to inform, or be informed by, the direction that they might wish to take upon graduation.

Architectural Research

Year 1 Architectural Research I

Architectural culture has never been exclusively a product of professionally-trained architects, but now, more than ever, people working in related fields shape debates and ideas around architecture in significant ways. Architectural Research I aims to introduce these ‘other’ modes of contributing to architectural knowledge.

Architectural Research I is a 10-week course offered in Term 1. It explores four themes in total in two sessions: the first week will see a topic/assignment introduced by an invited speaker; the second will see a discussion/crit of the work. The themes that are covered include:

· Researching Architecture (heritage, history, criticism);

· Writing Architecture (criticism, books, blogs);

· Exhibiting Architecture (curating, museums, art fairs);

· Speaking Architecture (touring, teaching, broadcasting)

Year 2 Architectural Research II

Architectural Research II will put the research skills acquired in Architectural Research I into action. It is a 10-week Group Project (though each member’s contribution will be individually assessed). Each year, a different theme will be set by the module leader. The group must then research the theme with an eye to producing an exhibition in the Bartlett lobby at the end of the course.

The group will be put into teams and given responsibility for a set task. This might include library or archival research, oral interviews, writing/editing wall texts, making curatorial decisions to do with the display, designing and fabricating display cases, organizing the event layout, and arranging publicity for the event.

Year 3 Dissertation

The Dissertation in Architectural Studies enables students to undertake an independent research project into an architectural subject that they have identified and wish to explore in greater depth. The emphasis in this course is on conducting original research and producing investigative in-depth written studies, supported by appropriate visual documentation. This course is taught between Terms 1 and 2 mainly through individual or small group tutorials.

Units and Showcases

Work by students in The Bartlett School of Architecture is of the highest quality. It is exhibited every year in the world's largest exhibition of design work by architecture students - the annual Summer Show with around 15,000 visitors - as well as being published in Bartlett Designs: Speculating with Architecture (Wiley, 2009).

Follow the links below to explore a massive range of student work produced throughout the BSc Architecture programme.

Year 1 thumb BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies
The educational aim of BSc AIS is to educate students to work within an expanded definition and understanding of architecture. It addresses architectural space from an interdisciplinary perspective, explores alternative approaches to architectural design ...

Staff

The BSc (Hons) Architectural Studies programme is run by three members of staff:

Dr Barbara Penner
View Barbara's profile 

Send Barbara a message

Elizabeth Dow

Send Elizabeth a message

Chee-Kit Lai
Send Chee-Kit a message


In addition, external lecturers and critics regularly contribute talks and workshops to the programme. Recent contributors have included:

• Matthew Butcher (architectural tutor and practitioner)

• Christophe Gerard (film-maker and architect)

• Brandon LaBelle (sound artist)

• Yesomi Umolu (curator, writer and researcher)

• Prof. Jane Rendell (architectural critic and historian)

• Prof. Iain Borden (architectural and urban historian)

Applying

How to Apply

As of as of 2013-4, BSc Architectural Studies will be replaced by two new courses:
•  BSc Architectural and Interdisciplinary Studies (3 year) &
•  BSc Architectural and Interdisciplinary Studies with Year Abroad (4 year)

Admissions will be from Year 1. Students will normally require grades of AAB and Art is mandatory.

Please consult the relevant UCAS pages for more detailed information about applying.

How to Transfer (for currently enrolled BSc Architecture students)

As previously with the BSc Architectural Studies programme, the new BSc AIS is open to students who have already completed one year of BSc Architecture, Planning or Construction Management and have passed three course units. Students may also enter the course in year two or year three if a total of seven course units have been passed.

Transfer students from other universities have also been accepted in the past. Please note, however, that you need to have successfully completed one full year of study at your home institution, preferably in a department of architecture, with a minimum of a 2:1 for us to consider your application.

When to Transfer (for currently enrolled BSc Architecture students)

Students must first discuss the possibility of a transfer with their unit tutor and/or BSc course director and the BSc Architectural Studies Course Director, Barbara Penner. The decision to transfer can be made at any time before the academic year begins. Once term is underway, year two or three students can also consider switching at the very end of term one.

The transfer process itself is easy - it only requires the completion of a Change of Degree Programme Form, which should be handed in to Chris Cutbush in our Faculty Office (Room 107).

Entry Requirements

For New Applicants

How to Apply

For information on application procedures and fees, please consult the relevant UCAS pages:

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies (3 year)

&

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies with Year Abroad (4 year)

More detailed information about the application follows below.

BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies at the Bartlett School of Architecture

The Bartlett School of Architecture is an exciting place to start your architectural education. The BSc AIS degree offers a challenging environment with an open-minded and multi-disciplinary approach towards architecture. We are looking for equally open-minded students to challenge and to push the boundaries of architecture.

Preparing your application

As you will have understood from our website, 2013-4 is the first year that we are accepting students onto this programme from Year 1. We are thus keen to make contact with as many applicants as possible and, if you have not already done so, we would encourage you to contact the Course Director, Barbara Penner (b.penner@ucl.ac.uk), if you have any questions about the programme or would like to come into the Bartlett for a tour or set up an meeting by phone/Skype.

Portfolio

Even though the BSc AIS is not an ARB/RIBA accredited course, it does still revolve very much around design and creative practice. Consequently, in your application, it is important that we see some evidence of your creative talents in order that we can better judge your suitability to the programme. We would also like to see a sample of your writing to learn more about you.

A minimum of ten items that represent the range of your work and demonstrate your visual/spatial and creative abilities. These might include a freehand drawing, a painting, a photograph, a sculpture, something else you have made (an object, model, film etc.). Surprise us! It is important that each of the above items should include a brief explanation of what they are made of, their meaning to you and what ideas relevant to architecture they might contain. The items should be sent in the form of a small A4 portfolio of scans or annotated photographs. Please do not send originals as they will not be returned to you.

Open Day

We will be running an Open Day for all applicants who are offered a place, to be held on Thursday, 14 February, 2013, 10-1pm, in Rm. G04. Further details of the Open Day will be circulated closer to the time. Parents are welcome.

Applicants are encouraged to visit our end-of-year show held every year in late June. For more information on the Summer Show, please see here.

For currently enrolled BSc Architecture students

How to Transfer

As previously with the BSc Architectural Studies programme, the new BSc AIS is open to students who have already completed one year of BSc Architecture, Planning or Construction Management and have passed three course units. Students may also enter the course in year two or year three if a total of seven course units have been passed. [Please note: you do not need to recommence at Year 1.] Transfer students from other universities have also been accepted in the past. Please note, however, that you need to have successfully completed one full year of study at your home institution, preferably in a department of architecture, with a minimum of a 2:1 for us to consider your application.

When to Transfer

Students must first discuss the possibility of a transfer with their unit tutor and/or BSc course director and the BSc AIS Course Director, Barbara Penner. The decision to transfer can be made at any time before the academic year begins. Once term is underway, year two or three students can also consider switching at the very end of term one. The transfer process itself is easy - it only requires the completion of a Change of Degree Programme Form, which should be handed in to Chris Cutbush in our Faculty Office (Room 107).

Opportunities

The first cohort of students on the BSc Architectural and Interdisciplinary Studies three-year programme are due to graduate after 2016, therefore no exact information about career destinations is available. However, the programme replaces an existing BSc Architectural Studies, which has a strong track record with over 90 graduates in the last ten years.

Graduates have gone on to postgraduate studies and professional careers in a wide variety of fields including:

• accounting

• academia

• arts education and management/curating

• charity work

• conservation

• construction management

• design

• documentary film-making

• education

• fine arts

• heritage

• international health and development

• journalism

• landscape architecture

• law

• lighting design

• marketing, media and communications

• museum management

• NGOs

• photography

• planning

• property valuation

• publishing

• set design

• surveying

• zoo management

Students have pursued graduate studies at UCL, as well as at other universities such as the Royal College of Art, Central St Martin’s, Goldsmith’s, City University, London School of Economics, Imperial College and ETH in Zurich. (See list below)

For comments on BSc Architectural Studies by graduates of the programme, please see below.

Further Degrees taken by former AS students

MBBS Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, King's College,


Masters Art History, Birkbeck

Masters Design, Central St Martin's 


Masters Art History, Courtauld Institute of Art

Masters Property Valuation and Law, City University 


Masters Management, City University Business School 


Masters Journalism, City University 


Masters Arts Management, City University


Masters Research Architecture, Goldsmiths 


Masters Landscape Design, ETH (Zurich) 


Masters Management, Imperial College London

Masters Public Policy, School of Social Science and Public Policy, King's College London


Masters Culture, Media and Creative Industries, King's College London Masters Spatial Design, London College of Communication


Masters NGOs and Development, London School of Economics


Masters Interior Design, Scuola Politecnica di Milano (SPD)

Masters Islamic Arts, Prince's Foundation


Masters Print-making, Royal College of Art


Masters Sculpture, Royal College of Art

Masters Architecture, Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-ARC)

Masters Planning Policy and Practice, Southbank University


Masters Advanced Architectural Studies, Bartlett School of Graduate Studies, UCL


Masters Architectural History, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL


Masters Engineering, UCL


Masters European Property Development and Planning, Bartlett School of Planning, UCL

Masters Media, Slade School of Fine Art, UCL


Masters Planning, UCL


Masters Architecture: Advanced Energy and Environmental Studies, University of East London/ Centre for Alternative Technology, Wales

Masters European History, SEESS, University of London

Masters Building Surveying

Masters Publishing


PhD Management, University of Edinburgh


Internships

A10 New European Architecture (Amsterdam)


Architects for Aid


Architecture Foundation (London)

Crafts Council (London)


Donald Judd Foundation (New York)


Estorick Collection of Modern Italian Art (London)


The Gopher Hole (London)

Peggy Guggenheim Collection (Venice)


La Machine (Nantes)


Open City (London)

Sotheby's (London)


White Cube (London)

Prizes/Projects

2009 Prix de la Sculpture, Noilly Prat, France


Interior design, 40 Store Street, London
Installation,

Central Teaching Laboratory, University of Liverpool



Former Student Testimonials

[Please note: these are students who graduated from BSc Architectural Studies which BSc Architectural & Interdisciplinary Studies replaces from 2013-4]

Ruth A Allan, 2005, NGO Country Director, South Sudan

I began at the Bartlett School of Architecture with an interest in design, the built environment and social space. I decided that although I did not want to practice within the architectural profession, I wanted to continue my interest in a constructed society, its development and survival.

Architectural Studies allowed me to remain in the inspired and diversely stimulating environment of the Bartlett, continue to pursue a creative outlet through Project X, and fulfill my need for a solid grounding in a less conceptual reality. Architectural Studies allows one to be part of the greater ethos of UCL - societies, active student networks and forward-thinking activist approaches - in a way the tunnel vision of professional study does not.

I view the Bartlett as a unique environment in which to study; to be able to self-direct ones spatial design or creative work, in whatever medium, with the high level of teaching staff, fellow students and discussions, is a very valuable opportunity. The work ethic of the school and the thought processes that are developed are unquestionably powerful and useful in whatever one goes on to do. I have continued to value the transferable skills and attitudes the Bartlett left with me.

As with many people, my interests and emphasis changed as I progressed. On graduation, I directed my career towards humanitarian work. Taking forward a spatial understanding and project experience, I worked for non-government organisations (NGOs) in Pakistan following the 2005 earthquake and in Darfur, Sudan. I returned to the London School of Economics in 2009, completing my MSc in Humanitarian Emergencies and Social Policy. After consultancies with Oxfam and United Nations, I am now the Country Director of the health NGO Malaria Consortium in Juba, Republic of South Sudan.

There are always parallels to be drawn between earlier experiences. Some are directly transferable, others less obviously so. For example, the time pressure of managing and motivating a team on the Bartlett first year installation project compared with the construction of tented clinic facilities in camps for displaced people in Pakistan-administered Kashmir; or preparing a university-researched dissertation compared with a report on a current conflict for the United Nations.

The Bartlett is more than a pure architecture school leading people into the building profession. I believe Architectural Studies allows one to develop a way of seeing and to study within an open-minded school of creative thought which allows you to step into many diverse and sometimes unexpected outcomes.


Joey Clark, 2008, Medical Student

Having always had a passion for art and design I realised architecture was not the branch that inspired me the most. Project X allowed me to maintain a creative outlet, but incorporate a theme I was more passionate about but had long since forgotten - medical illustration. My final project was an exploration of the representation of suturing relating to aortic stenosis. I extended this anatomical interest to my History and Theory of Architecture dissertation, looking at human dissection as art.

Architectural Studies' ability to allow students to explore interests outside architecture is of its essence. The opportunity to select modules from across UCL was central to me finding my place in an entirely different discipline. The most significant module was Anatomy for Artists where I worked alongside medical students, both in the UCL dissection room and in lectures. There I rekindled my passion for anatomy which eventually escalated into a desire to study medicine. Initially it was difficult to admit to myself I was on the wrong path, but after changing course I was infinitely happier and found my work more enjoyable.


Amber Fahey, 2011, Architecture Foundation (Intern)

Architectural Studies presented me first with the opportunity to design a building, and then a tailored degree programme that enabled me to academically pursue a broad range of interests. Taking modules within a range of UCL’s world-class departments, while centring yourself in the cutting-edge environment of the Bartlett, allows you to be multifaceted in your learning, gain experience in many fields at once, and even to embark on new subjects that you are curious to explore; among my options, I was able to begin learning French, and to study Astronomy at the University of London Observatory. With every module being elective, each graduate finishes the course with a unique degree. Alongside developing a broad range of employable skills, this route enabled me to become more involved in UCL as a body, to take part in more extra-curricular activities, and to discover the vast number of opportunities that being a UCL student offers.

The core modules unique to Architectural Studies, although also optional, are Project X and the Advanced Architectural Dissertation. They are run by exceptional tutors within the Bartlett, who give a huge amount of one to one time, support, inspiration, knowledge, expert opinions, and constructive feedback throughout. They encourage you to explore a range of working methods before specialising and pursuing topics and ideas that you are most passionate about, and assist you in using them to stimulate a successful body of work. Other experts are also brought in to offer additional feedback and advice, and a number of group discussions are held throughout each year. In Project X you are also encouraged to continually refine your chosen methods of spatial creation and representation, which can be realised through any medium of your choosing.

Architectural Studies has opened my mind to the endless possibilities and opportunities that can be pursued, rather than having a predetermined career path. Project X and Dissertation have in particular taught me how much I enjoy creatively communicating ideas, as well as equipping me to do so. Currently I am working at the Architecture Foundation, which keeps me connected with the world of Architecture in a range of contexts. There I am able continue working in a creative workplace, where I am involved in the communication of the rich and diverse variety of cultural events hosted; including exhibitions, talks, film screenings, educational projects and more.


Lynne Holtum, 2007, Fitzrovia Construction Ltd, MSc Building Surveying

I think the fact that Architectural Studies allows you to tailor your degree to your interests and desired directions was its most important aspect. In my career so far it is easy to see how the breadth of knowledge I gained has been useful. Though this knowledge may not be at as dense a level as a more concentrated discipline would provide, my introduction to different subjects means that when I have encountered similar circumstances at work I have been able to recognise this and further my understanding from there. Also the openness of the dissertation module gave me an opportunity to learn about a subject in which I had a great interest, and turned it from an interest into something about which I am passionate.


Rupert Muldoon, 2004, Painter and Landscape Architect (www.rupertmuldoon.com)

After my first year at the Bartlett, I chose to leave the more conventional architecture route as Architectural Studies offered me a chance to decide upon my own course of studies within the different departments at UCL. At the Bartlett I concentrated on the history and theory of architecture and was encouraged to explore my personal interests. I became engrossed in landscape as art and the relationship between art within landscape.

In the History of Art department I specialised in the Conservation and Restoration of Easel Paintings, which had a strong influence on my own painting. Theatre design and sculpture electives at the Slade School of Art again fed directly into my model making at the Bartlett and a larger exploration of space.

Following university I have experienced a wide range of activities relevant to my degree and other interests, which have enabled me to cross boundaries between art and design and also to experience them in a commercial context. I have continued to paint, exhibiting successfully in London, with a solo show on Bond Street in 2011.

In 2009 I completed my MA in Landscape Architecture at ETH Zurich. I stayed in Switzerland for a further year to work within a landscape architecture practice that has a global perspective and a strong emphasis upon artistic conceptual principles and practical design skills. Landscape is a new-found scale of working for me. It is one continuous mass and must be approach with the holistic view of an artist. What I am most fascinated by as an artist and a designer is the identity of a place.


Satu Streatfield, 2005, Designer working with light

The philosophy and ethos behind the Architectural Studies degree is one that any genuinely creative degree programme at university level should aspire to. The course supports students in the pursuit and development of their own creative and critical voice, encouraging them to continually refine and criticise their chosen methods of space creation and representation. My time on the course was definitely the most liberating, challenging, enlightening, stimulating and definitive of my education. I am still passionate about the concepts and theories that I explored for my dissertation and Project X and am eternally grateful for the encouragement, criticism, knowledge and inspiration of the course tutors and the specialist tutors they brought in.

My two years on the course paved my way to a job where I'm practicing the very things that I fell in love with on the AS course - using ephemeral media to create and augment space. I work in an inspiring and internationally well-respected team that uses light to create spaces that can morph from being intimate to beautiful to awesome to uncomfortable to intimidating and back again in a matter of minutes. I work with a medium capable of evoking sleep as well as stimulation, one which can soothe as well as cause pain, can reveal space, define and redefine it or make it disappear. During the past four years I've worked in the UK and abroad on urban strategies, landscapes, cultural centres, heritage sites, public buildings and squares, skyscrapers, sculptures, art installations and present and future landmarks. I have lectured internationally and genuinely love what I do and am sure it would have taken many more years to get here without my AS degree.


Freddy Tuppen, 2009, Artist

During my two years spent on the Architectural Studies course I was able to develop a range of interests in fields related to architecture, whilst keeping open many possible avenues to explore once graduating. It was a difficult decision to move into AS having realised that BSc Arch was not where I saw my future but having decided to go for it there have been no regrets.

In Project X, I led an in depth study into our experience of architectural space through sound. This culminated in a series of live, interactive sound installations that have subsequently been show in exhibitions in London and New York. I have just finished the first of two years on the MFA Media course at the Slade School of Art where I am expanding upon the themes I began to consider at the Bartlett. Since leaving the AS course there have also been opportunities to continue my architectural practice in a variety of forms, such as building the interior of a café on Store Street and winning a commission for a large scale installation at Liverpool University.

There are numerous varied and exciting options for a Bartlett student other that an RIBA qualification and the AS course encourages students to develop a broader spectrum of specific interests, providing opportunities that few other courses can offer.


Alexia Vasilikou, 2005, Press Officer, Museum of Cycladic Art, Athens, Greece

Spending a few years as a student of the Bartlett was the first step towards shaping a creative way of thinking. The AS course opened up so many possibilities for me. Most important of all are the people that make the AS course. All tutors showed a great amount of dedication, treating each student on a one-to-one basis, and taking a close look into each one's strengths, needs and potential. Guiding and at the same time setting free.

The opportunity to attend modules within other departments of UCL was an enlightening experience, understanding the great quality and ethos of UCL at its full extent. And also getting the chance to meet people with diverse interests and become acquainted with a variety of academic fields. A way to find out what suits one best.

During my studies on the AS course, I discovered my passion for art and realised I would be spending my future years working in the cultural sector. Following an MA in Arts Management, I have been working at the Museum of Cycladic Art for three years, in the Communication and Development Department.


Olivia Wodehouse, 2005, Property Investment and Development Surveyor (Knight Frank)

The Architectural Studies course at the Bartlett gave me the ability and freedom to explore architectural ideas through a different medium. Each project could take on the form you desired rather than being restricted to creating physical spaces. The final products that were generated over the course of the year were surprising and diverse and yet each one had a definite affinity to architecture. I enjoyed the strong interaction between other students and tutors, and the encouragement to follow ideas and really test them.

Since graduating from the Bartlett I have gone on to complete a master's in property valuation and law at Cass Business School and joined the graduate scheme at Knight Frank. My role now involves consulting on potential development schemes in the city and working closely alongside architects. My love of architecture is still strong and I enjoy the tangible way in which I can include this in both my career my personal life.


Jenni Young, 2008, Architectural Writer and Editor, Italy

When I first chose to study architecture I was attracted by the possibility of mixing both art and science but, as someone who couldn't restrain the number of subjects they were interested in, I felt I was missing out on something during the two years I studied BSc Architecture. When I looked at the Architectural Studies program, I suddenly felt I had found what I had been missing; there are so many subjects that influence and are affected by architecture and design. During my time on the AS course I divided my time between planning, anthropology, history of art, and management. I developed a strong interest in anthropology, of which I had not had any previous experience, and had a chance to take modules in other top-class departments at UCL on, for example, the Anthropology of Architecture and the Social Construction of Landscape.

I developed a focus on the experience of architecture and the individual's relationship with the built environment, and I used what I was learning in the different departments to drive my own interests through my essays and final dissertation. A key part of the course was Project X. I was, and still am, interested in writing and architecture, and PX was where I could explore these ideas without the constriction of having to write an essay or design a building.

I am now working for an innovative architecture practice in Italy, which focuses on the way we understand and interact with cities, and I still contribute to the design table in a diverse number of ways, including writing and editing articles for the architectural press. The experiences I have had have been fantastic and I believe the opportunities I have been offered are due to the range of skills I developed through such a formidable multidisciplinary education. One thing hasn't changed since my time at the Bartlett: I am still involved with those striving to be at the cutting-edge of architecture - it's a very inspiring place.